Tag: brokerage

The Benefits of Investing in Office Buildings

4 Shackleford Plaza

By Bill Puddephatt, CCIM

 

Investing in the CRE-Office sector can offer an excellent opportunity to diversify one’s investment portfolio. A CRE office property is a hard, tangible asset which has historically performed well over time. When the opportunity presents itself and if the time is right for you, it is wise to engage the services of an experienced CRE agent who can help evaluate and develop an investment strategy that is suited specifically for your needs and goals. It is also advisable to engage your CPA and attorney for their expertise at some point in time as well.

There are two types of investors: owner/users who intend to occupy the purchased property and those who strategically invest for the income stream and future appreciation value.

OWNERS/USERS

If you are an owner/user, you have better control over occupancy costs as you can manage levelized mortgage loan payments and have more control over operating costs such as real estate taxes, building insurance costs, property management fees, and grounds and building maintenance expenses. This provides an advantage tenants cannot have as they are often subject to annual rent increases, escalating operating costs, and a fair rate of return added for the landlord.

INCOME-GENERATING INVESTORS

Others chose to invest in CRE office property assets as an alternative way to diversify their portfolio while at the same time building a steady reliable cash flow. This type of investment also provides tax-favored treatment such as depreciation and capital gains treatment when you sell. You may also defer your gains via a 1031 tax deferred exchange by rolling your gains into a like-kind property when you sell. The 1031 tax deferred exchange has specific rules which one’s CPA can assist in analyzing for you. Read more about 1031 Exchanges by clicking here.

Both scenarios are considered excellent diversification strategies that may allow investors to achieve an attractive rate of return that can continue to grow over time, as well as the opportunity to sell and realize a gain resulting in a more favorable capital gains tax rate treatment than that of an ordinary income tax rate.  And one doesn’t need to start with a large investment. You may decide to invest as a sole owner of a small property or as a partner/member of a larger entity. The latter provides the advantage of spreading out your risks, as a larger property likely has more tenants, which means if a tenant vacates a space, it is less impactful than losing a tenant in a smaller building with a single or very few tenants.

And last but certainly not least, investing in the CRE office sector provides another incalculable benefit: the pride of ownership!

As with any investment opportunity, risks are involved. This is why it is important to work with a professional commercial real estate broker who understands the market and can help you identify and carefully evaluate any potential investment opportunity to ensure that it aligns with your goals and risk tolerance. With the right approach, investing in office buildings can be a great way to build long-term wealth and generate passive income.

 

Bill Puddephatt, CCIM

Bill Puddephatt, CCIM

Bill Puddephatt, a distinguished veteran of the Central Arkansas banking industry, made a seamless transition into the real estate brokerage field with Kelley Commercial Partners. With a remarkable career that included originating over $1 billion in loans without a single loss, Bill’s expertise in financing encompasses a wide range of real estate ventures, from office buildings to multi-family projects, hotels to subdivision developments. Renowned as a trusted advisor, he offers clients tailored solutions in the ever-changing realm of real estate.

Kelley Commercial Partners has an award-winning team of real estate professionals with the experience and knowledge to ensure you maximize your potential and reach your financial goals. Let us help you create a clear plan and provide the guidance you need to confidently move forward. Contact us today or click the links below to learn about current office property investment opportunities in Central Arkansas.

Office Building Investment Opportunities

Tenant Improvement Allowances

Tenant improvement allowances, or TIAs, are a common aspect of commercial leases. They refer to the amount of money that a landlord is willing to contribute towards the cost of renovations or customizations made to a leased property by the tenant. These allowances can play a critical role in determining whether a tenant can afford to take on a lease, and they can also be a point of negotiation between the landlord and tenant.

Tenant improvement allowancesThe first step in determining the amount of a tenant improvement allowance is to establish the scope of the project. This typically involves creating a detailed list of all the renovations or customizations that the tenant would like to make to the property, including the materials and labor required. The list should also include any necessary permits or approvals that will be required for the project.

Once the scope of the project is determined, the next step is to estimate the cost of the project by obtaining quotes from contractors or suppliers for the materials and labor required. The landlord can then decide on an allowance amount they are willing to contribute, which is generally a percentage of the total project cost. The percentage will vary depending on the landlord and the specific circumstances of the lease.

It’s important to note that the tenant improvement allowance is typically applied to the rent. This means that the tenant will pay a higher rent to the landlord to compensate for the allowance. Tenants should carefully consider the total cost of the lease, rent plus allowance, when deciding about whether to take on a lease.

From the landlord’s perspective, offering a tenant improvement allowance can be a way to attract and retain tenants in a commercial space. It can also be used to incentivize tenants to improve or upgrade a space in a way that benefits the overall property. A tenant improvement allowance can also benefit a tenant as it can reduce the costs associated with outfitting a space to meet their specific needs. Additionally, the tenant may be able to negotiate a higher allowance from the landlord if the tenant improvements benefit the property overall.

Tenant improvement allowances can play a key role in commercial lease negotiations and greatly benefit both tenants and landlords. When discussing tenant improvements, it’s crucial to have a defined goal and a well-thought-out strategy. At Kelley Commercial, our experienced professionals are ready to assist you in creating a clear plan and provide the guidance you need to confidently negotiate the best possible outcome as a tenant or landlord. Contact us today to learn more about how we can help you make an informed decision.

Due Diligence Explained

Due diligence typically involves reviewing and gathering a variety of information about a property, including financial records, legal documents, appraisals, and physical inspections before a buyer or seller enters into an agreement. The role of a commercial real estate agent in the due diligence process is to act as a facilitator, helping to gather and organize information, and to serve as a resource for the buyer or seller as they assess the potential risks and liabilities associated with the purchase or sale of a commercial property.

Due Diligence

Our job is to facilitate transactions for either buyers or sellers.

Due Diligence for Buyers

From the buyer’s perspective, due diligence is an important step in the process of purchasing commercial real estate because it helps them make an informed decision about whether to purchase the property and to understand the potential risks and liabilities associated with the purchase. Some specific tasks that may be involved in due diligence for a commercial real estate transaction from the buyer’s perspective include:

  • Reviewing financial documents, such as tax records, budgets, and income statements, to assess the financial health and performance of the property.
  • Examining legal documents, such as leases, contracts, and deeds, to understand the property’s ownership and any legal liabilities or obligations associated with it.
  • Conducting physical inspections of the property to assess its condition and identify any potential issues or repairs that may need to be addressed.
  • Reviewing environmental reports and assessments to ensure that the property is in compliance with local and national environmental regulations and to identify any potential environmental hazards.
Due Diligence for Sellers

From the seller’s perspective, due diligence is the process of providing information and documentation about the property to the potential buyer. The seller is responsible for disclosing any known issues or problems with the property, as well as providing any relevant financial and legal documents for the buyer to review. In addition to providing information to the buyer, the seller may also want to conduct their own due diligence on the buyer. This could involve reviewing the buyer’s financial situation and ability to purchase the property, as well as their plans for the property once they take ownership.

Our associates at Kelley Commercial Partners have the experience and knowledge to ensure seamless property transactions for either buyers or sellers. If you’re considering the acquisition of a property or the sale of property, consider representation from our team. Contact one of our experts today.

Predictions about commercial real estate in Little Rock circa 2050

In this month’s issue of the Arkansas Times, Hank Kelley shared his thoughts about what the commercial real estate industry will look like in 2050. 

Hank Kelley, CEO

Hank Kelley, CEO

Connectivity

There is demand now — and will be in the future — for unique living and workspaces in multiple-story buildings so your space can be close to other residents and professionals, and to other recreational and educational uses. The way we “go to work” now will change over the next 30 years, and the need to have the same level of hard-wall separate office areas within a building will change. More emphasis will be placed on a building’s connectivity for virtual connections than exists today. Even today, mobile professionals regularly chart their destinations based on the connection to credible Wi-Fi. In 30 years, the need for high-quality connections will be a constant and core requirement.

The exterior of buildings will hopefully be a source of energy generation through advances in solar panel technology, but not at the expense of views within the spaces. More filtering will improve indoor air quality. Rooftop decks and balconies with sunscreen canopies will be the norm as people continue to want to be outdoors but become even more concerned about sun exposure.

Mixed-Use

I believe we will continue to see an evolution of larger office buildings to include a mixture in their uses. The cost of converting their use, though, will have to be feasible before developers will invest in the remodeling needed for conversion. The conversion of office buildings to residential and or hospitality (hotel) requires extensive plumbing and mechanical alterations, and those changes will only happen when adequate demand for those uses justifies the conversion cost. In the short run, we will see workspaces within the buildings compressed to more flexible work environments and, in some cases, with even more open floor spaces for cubicle and tabletop workspaces. Landlords will become more flexible on tenant expansion and contraction needs to retain their tenants and use the surplus space they have to attract growing businesses.

The office buildings and existing residential condo buildings in Little Rock’s Central Business District represent the highest density of population per mile in our city and region, and companies will continue to be attracted by the excellent accessibility to both I-30 and I-40. People who live in midrise and high-rise buildings in the Central Business District enjoy walkable amenities now — the Central Arkansas Library, the Robinson Center, the Arkansas Museum of Fine Arts — and we believe the demand for walkable amenities will grow over time.

“’Hoteling’ of office space and rotation of in-office and out-of-office workdays will become more of a norm.”

As regards trends toward remote working, we don’t believe the majority of companies will choose a completely remote workforce because of the challenges in maintaining the culture needed to compete. “Hoteling” of office space and rotation of in-office and out-of-office workdays will become more of a norm. We continue to believe there is value in the separation of workspace and living space. The networking component of “going to work” is now and will continue to be a valuable need for workers and companies.

Energy Efficiency

We will see great advances in products and technology to conserve and generate energy, water and land at both the individual user level, but also at the utility provider level. We are hopeful those advances will reduce operating costs and help preserve our natural resources. The office building industry has been active in conservation efforts through the LEED certification process. Maintaining buildings to operate at peak efficiency will become a requirement to own and operate a building, and utility providers will charge non-compliant building owners penalties for excessive consumption.

We expect that fewer people will own their own cars, meaning we will see less of a need for parking spaces.

Finally, inflation will increase interest rates on the debt and the cost of services to maintain existing buildings. Some building owners are not prepared for their debt and operating expenses to increase, as they have been trying to maintain current rent levels with tenants. This means less income is available to pay debt and reinvest in building upgrades needed to maintain an efficient and attractive building. The squeeze of increasing costs will challenge some building owners and cause a change in ownership if those owners don’t have adequate reserves. Tenants will seek out buildings with owners who have the financial resources and desire to reinvest in their properties.

Hank Kelley is CEO and Executive Broker at Kelley Commercial Partners, and has been working in brokerage and property management in Little Rock for 36 years.

Commercial Real Estate Leases: The Basics

Leases: The Basics

 

Whether you are a property owner with leasable land or space or an individual looking for space to lease, it’s important to know the basics of the types of leases that are most common in the commercial real estate world.

Gross Lease

In a gross lease (also known as a full-service lease) the tenant pays a flat monthly rate while the landlord remains responsible for all operating costs of the property including taxes, insurance, and maintenance, as well as other expected costs, such as janitorial service. Because landlords must cover all of the property’s operating costs, the rental rate for gross leases is generally higher than for a net lease. In exchange for paying a higher rate, the tenant has the security of a fixed monthly rent payment, minimizing the possibility for variations in their operating costs, making budgeting more predictable and less complicated.

Net Leases

Net leases shift some or all the operating costs associated with a property to the tenants, and tenants are responsible for that cost in addition to their regular rent. There are three types of net leases: single, double, and triple. Tenants with a single net lease are responsible for one of the operating costs associated with the property, generally the property taxes. With a double net (net-net) lease, the tenant assumes the cost of two of the operating costs, generally the property taxes and insurance. With a triple net (NNN) lease, the tenant assumes all of the property’s operating costs, which include taxes, insurance, and all maintenance costs. Lastly, there is a variation of the triple net lease called absolute net lease (also known as a bondable lease). This type of lease relieves the property owner/investor from all financial obligations and risks associated with the property, including taxes, insurance, structural maintenance, and debt liability. All those obligations are passed on to the tenant normally in exchange for a lower base rent.

Benefits of Net Leases

From the landlord’s perspective, entering into a net lease can simplify the management and operation of the property, which can be especially beneficial if they own multiple properties. Furthermore, net lease rates are typically made for longer terms, which gives the landlord the benefit of long and stable income from the property.

Because net lease tenants assume more of the unpredictable costs associated with maintaining the property, their base rent is often at a reduced market rate. This can mean considerable savings in rent over the long term of the lease. While annual rent increases may be built into the lease agreement, they usually remain below the rate one would pay with a gross lease.

Ground Lease

Yet another variation of a net lease is a ground lease. An owner with undeveloped land may enter into a ground lease in which the lessee agrees to incur the cost of developing the property (i.e., construct a building or business on the land) and in exchange, pays only a NNN lease on the land. Ground lease terms are long, generally 50 to 99 years, but when the lease term ends, the ownership of the both the building and the land revert to the owner.

Negotiating a Lease

Before entering into a lease agreement as “lessor” or “lessee”, know your options so that you can benefit the most from the deal. Agents at Kelley Commercial Partners have the knowledge and experience to walk you through the process and negotiate with your best interests in mind.